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Cesarean Sections for Pregnant Tubal Reversal Patients

A cesarean section is an operation where the baby is delivered through an opening made in the lower belly area. Many of c-sections are done because the woman has had a previous cesarean section. If you had one done for your last pregnancy, most doctors prefer to have all your other babies delivered by cesarean section. This is especially true if the first c-section was done because the baby couldn’t fit through your pelvic area. Other cesarean sections are done when you and your baby may be in some danger. The cesarean section allows the baby to be delivered in minutes to prevent damage to you or the baby.

Before the procecure, you usually will have an IV started to allow fluids and medicines to be given to you through a needle in your arm. General aenesthesia is used if you prefer to be asleep during the c-section or there is an emergency that necessitates its use. In most cases, doctors will use an epidural aenesthetic, which provides numbing of the body from the waist to the toes, while you remain awake. A numbing medication, something similar to novacaine, is injected into the lower portion of the back which gradually causes the lower part of your body to feel tingly, heavy, and eventually without any feeling or ability to move your legs. You will feel no pain during delivery, but the feeling gradually returns in an hour or so.

Your belly will be cleaned off and then a cut is made in the lower part of your belly and then through your uterus. The baby and placenta are removed. The cuts are sewn. When the baby is out, the cord is cut and the baby is cleaned up. The baby will be placed next to you for you to see and hold or may be put into a warmer.

Since there is a cut made into the abdomen there is a chance that a bleeding may occur or an infection could develop. There are also certain problems that may occur because of the anesthesia used. However, should a problem develop, prompt treatment usually corrects the difficulty. Complications following cesarean sections are not common.